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  • Minewattie
    November 24, 2021
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    Attached is my Recommended Revised Redistricting Draft Map P (as in Peter). Thank you.
  • Monet
    November 24, 2021
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    This map is in relation to JFKBRZY/AD Map drafts; Uniting the neighborhoods of Arverne and Edgemere and preserving county lines.
  • Howard
    November 23, 2021
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    Attached is map for AD 27
  • Michele
    November 23, 2021
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    On behalf of the Unity Map Coalition, attached please find our proposed Congressional district plan for New York City. The Unity Map Coalition is comprised of the Asian American Legal Defense and Education Fund, the Center for Law and Social Justice at Medgar Evers College, CUNY and LatinoJustice PRLDEF. If you have any questions, please do not hesitate to contact me. Many Thanks, Michele C. Lamberti, Esq. Redistricting Project Coordinator Unity Map Coalition michele.c.lamberti@gmail.com (917) 270-1340
  • Anthony
    November 23, 2021
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    Southeastern Saratoga County.
  • Anthony
    November 23, 2021
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    The urban and suburban core of the Capital District which is mostly in the current 20th Congressional District of New York.
  • Anthony
    November 23, 2021
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    The urban/suburban part of Schenectady County and southern Saratoga County
  • Anthony
    November 23, 2021
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    The urban/suburban part of Schenectady County and southern Saratoga County
  • Jake
    November 22, 2021
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    This map promotes minority representation in New York City and creates more competitive districts on Staten Island, Long Island, and in upstate New York.
  • Nicolas
    November 22, 2021
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    This map reflects a collective effort by the New York Law School Census Redistricting Team to accommodate the loss of District 27. The growth in the State of New York was fueled by New York City and neighboring counties. Upstate New York led the state in population loss which resulted in the loss of a single Congressional District. Because Upstate continues to decline in population and the New York City area continues to bring in more citizens, one district was eliminated in upstate New York. When drawing the congressional districts there was a focus on where the congressional district had been drawn. Without knowing the addresses of the incumbents, we wanted to keep the numbered districts as close to their original number as to not confuse constituents. After reviewing the 2010 Congressional map, we reviewed Census data to determine which part of the state lost the most residents. Upstate New York continues to decline in the overall population with New York City bringing in more residents than they are losing through natural births and new residents. Because New York City gained in population and Upstate New York saw a reduction in their population, it was evident that Congressional Districts 27 and 24 should merge while the population heavy centers of Rochester and Buffalo have increased their geographical presence to account for the need for more people in their respective districts. Congressional District 21 also lost residents with Hamilton County losing the most people in the past decade compared to any other county in the state. When creating each district the population decline, growth, birth rate, contiguity of counties, communities of interest including city boundaries, and population growth forecasts are all considered including which areas are more likely to lose a future district based on population trends. When stitching together the four different maps drawn by each team member I focused on contiguity, cities, traditional boundaries, maintaining the nine majority-minority districts, and requests from citizens at the IRC. While it was not possible for each member’s map to be put together as they were drawn, I believe I was able to preserve each member’s intent to their respective maps with minimal changes to achieve constitutional requirements.
  • Wai
    November 22, 2021
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    For Congressional redistricting, Sunset Park Brooklyn does not belong with Manhattan Chinatown. They’re separate by about 8 miles. Elmhurst Queens is just as far from Manhattan Chinatown as Sunset Park Brooklyn. Both Elmhurst and Sunset Park have longstanding and well-known Chinese immigrant communities connected to Chinatown by direct subway lines and other transport services. But few would argue that Elmhurst and Chinatown should be in the same congressional district. Whatever the original rationale, linking Sunset Park to Chinatown now only harms the Chinese community in southern Brooklyn. As reflected by census data, the southern Brooklyn Chinese community is now several times the size of Manhattan Chinatown. It is spread across the adjacent neighborhoods of Sunset Park, Dyker Heights, Bensonhurst, Bath Beach, Gravesend and Sheepshead Bay. Keeping together adjacent southern Brooklyn neighborhoods home to well over 200,000 Chinese residents should be a consideration in Congressional redistricting - not maintaining the serpentine 7th District gerrymander. Chinatown has been in decline for two decades and is no longer the locus of New York City’s Chinese community. Many in Brooklyn, Queens, and suburban Chinese communities, including extended family and neighbors, rarely go to Chinatown anymore. Therefore, in the attached map, I propose a compact southern Brooklyn Congressional district from Sunset Park to Marine Park, nearly all the southern neighborhoods of Brooklyn including the entirety of Coney Island. Chinese residents in these areas largely overlap with existing White communities (many of whom were the prior generation of immigrants). It would be a minority-majority district with a White plurality but where Asians constitute at least 30% of the population. It would be an improvement both from existing lines and the draft commission maps. It would allow Brooklyn to obtain some coherent political representation at the federal level, when it is currently cracked among 6 separate districts. This proposed southern Brooklyn district would also result in three significant NYC changes: (1) a Staten Island to Lower Manhattan district, (2) a Mid-Manhattan district that merges the largely identical west and east sides, and (3) an East River district in Brooklyn and Queens (somewhat similar to the Names plan) that stretches from Park Slope to Williamsburg to Astoria. Other districts shift somewhat to account for population gain and the loss of a NY seat from census reapportionment. For instance, the proposed south/west Bronx district 15 adds both Riverdale and Parkchester. The proposed central Brooklyn district 9 includes not only Crown Heights, Flatbush & Midwood, but would expand to include Borough Park. The Queens district 6 would lose parts of eastern Queens but gain more areas of central Queens such as Woodside. The proposed NYC map adopts some aspects of both the Names and Letters plans. The proposal also attempts to reduce the number of districts that divide each NYC borough, Brooklyn would go from being split among 6 districts to being divided by 4. Manhattan from 4 to 3.
  • Charles
    November 21, 2021
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    I propose the area outlined in yellow at the northern border of the proposed map of the 60th Assembly District be removed and the are outlined in green remain in my district.
  • Anne
    November 21, 2021
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    Please see the attached maps for the proposed redistricting of CD16 and CD17
  • Wai
    November 19, 2021
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    State Senate District 16 currently encompasses most of the Queens neighborhood of Elmhurst. The Letters plan SD AV continues to connect Elmhurst to a much larger Flushing based district - now by a narrow band along the Long Island Expressway in Rego Park. This turkey drumstick or asymmetric bar bell shaped district does not benefit the smaller Elmhurst portion of the district. Residents in Elmhurst are already largely ignored by the current State Senator. As a small and distant part of a much larger district, this area will continue to be heavily ignored under the draft map. There is sufficient population in northeastern Queens to maintain a Flushing based Asian majority district without Elmhurst. The Flushing district should simply encompass most of northeastern Queens north of the Long Island Expressway. A compact district encompassing Elmhurst, Maspeth, Middle Village, Glendale, Rego Park and Forest Hills would be in the best interest of Elmhurst residents. As shown in the attached maps, the Brooklyn Queens Expressway would be the western border, the Interborough and Forest Park would be the southern border, and the Grand Central Expressway and Flushing Meadows Corona Park would be the eastern border. The northern border would be a staircase line from the Long Island Expressway to Roosevelt Avenue. The northern border’s route is to ensure mostly Latino Corona and northeastern Elmhurst remain with the Hispanic majority district to the north. The central Queens neighborhoods in the proposed district are linked to Elmhurst: by major roadways including Queens Boulevard, Woodhaven Boulevard, Grand Avenue; by numerous bus routes including the Q47, Q58, Q59, Q60; by the M, R, E, F Subway lines. Major Queens shopping venues such as the Queens Center Mall, Rego Center and Shops at Atlas Park are all located in the proposed district and draw Elmhurst residents. And there has been noticeable spillover of Asian immigrant households from Elmhurst to adjoining neighborhoods, in particular Maspeth and Middle Village, as Census data will reflect. Given the impact of central Queens on adjoining districts, I’ve also included a proposed map that I believe fairly divides Queens into state senate districts based on neighborhood boundaries, natural barriers such as major roadways and parks, and demographic factors - but making some adjustments at district boundaries to ensure equal population. Much as the Commission’s draft maps, a western Queens district was drawn to stretch into Greenpoint Brooklyn and a southeastern Queens district also encompasses parts of Nassau County. But the major changes I suggest are (1) creating a central Queens district that includes Elmhurst, (2) dividing northeastern Queens into two districts horizontally, rather than creating a collar district around Flushing, and (3) removing Astoria from SD 13, the Latino majority district in northern Queens, and instead incorporating heavily Latino areas of Woodside.
  • Rafi
    November 18, 2021
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    here is my proposed map for NY similar to the Letters plan.