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  • Bartholomew
    September 24, 2021
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    I am submitting the attached State Senate map for the entire area North of the New York City line. This map presupposes that there the state is split such that there are 37 Senate Districts fully contained in New York City and Long Island, with the remaining 26 Senate Districts entirely north of New York City. This is closest whole number to an even geographic distribution. Since New York City has consistently seen higher growth rates than the state as a whole north of New York City, it is fair and proper for New York City districts to be slightly smaller than districts north of the city line. This plan only splits five municipalities; Buffalo, Rochester, Syracuse, Yonkers, and Mount Vernon. Every other city and town is contained within a single Senate district and no city is split more than once. There are a minimal number of county splits made by choice – rather than because the population distribution requires it, all of which serve to unite clear communities of interest. Overall this map is compact (significantly more so than current maps, or in my judgment the proposals of the IRC), has relatively few districts that would be blowouts for either party, increases minority representation by ensuring minority communities are not split, and respects communities of interest. It is described, region by region, below. Westchester and Rockland Counties: Districts 38, 39, 40, and 41. All four districts are fully contained within a single county and have 40-66% minority residents. District 38 consists of the Town of Greenburgh, and portions of the cities of Yonkers and Mount Vernon. It is a minority coalition district under the VRA, potentially considered a Black district under the VRA. District 39 consists of the remainder of Southern Westchester, excepting the City of White Plains. When viewed in combination, Districts 38 and 39 are each within 500 people of the ideal district for this block of 26 districts. District 40 is entirely within Westchester County as well, comprising the city of White Plains and all but two municipalities north of the major highway of the region, I-287. It is within 1000 residents of the ideal district for this block of 26 districts. District 41 is all of Rockland County except for the Town of Stony Point. Rockland County has slightly too many residents to serve as a self-contained State Senate District so must divest itself of its smallest municipality, which is on the northern border of the county. Mid-Hudson and Capital Region: Districts 42, 43, 44, 45, 46, and 48. District 42 is composed of the rural parts of Orange County, Stony Point, and entirety of Sullivan and Delaware Counties. It generally follows the course of NY-17. This district brings together the heart of the Catskills region. District 44 is a similar largely rural district that generally follows the course of I-684 and the Taconic State Parkway along the Eastern Border of New York. The towns further away from the Hudson River share more in common with each other than they do with the denser urban centers along the Hudson. In Rensselear County this district includes the areas with a weak commuting relationship to the City of Albany. Districts 43 and 45 unite the medium-sized urban centers of Poughkeepsie – Newburgh – Middletown – Kingston. District 43 is a compact district combining Beacon, Newburgh, Middletown, and surrounding areas. District 45 combines the Poughkeepsie and Kingston, along with a number of smaller cities along the Hudson River, along with the adjacent counties of Schoharie and Greene. District 46 is the entirety of Albany County; the County is within 2% of the ideal district for the state as a whole and therefore must be its own district per the State Constitution. District 48 is the inner ring suburbs of Albany, and most of the secondary cities of the Albany Capital region, in Schenectady, Saratoga, and Rensselear counties.   North Country and Central New York: Districts 47, 49, 50, 51, 52, 53, and 54. These seven districts represents a number of unique and distinct communities of interest across a wide swathe of upstate New York. District 47 combines the entirety of Broome County and Tompkins County, plus a connecting strip of land in Tioga County. The twin metro areas of Ithaca and Binghamton, which have been growing increasingly connected in recent years, anchor this district. District 49 includes almost all of Saratoga County, and all of Warren, Essex, and Washington Counties. It is a rectangle along the state’s border with Vermont that includes Albany exurbs and parts of the Green Mountains and Adirondack Mountains. District 50 is the North Country of New York State: Clinton, Franklin, St. Lawrence, and most of Jefferson County. It includes the cities of Plattsburgh, Massena, and Watertown. District 51 is centered on the core of the Adirondack Mountains and the Mohawk Valley. It is almost entirely rural and contains no major or minor urban centers. It crosses several county lines to maintain an even straight border that fully contains a unique set of communities. District 52 is the heart of the Mohawk Valley region, including the cities of Utica, Rome, and Oneonta. It contains all of Otsego and Chenango counties, half of Madison County, and almost all of Oneida County. Districts 53 and 54 are centered on the major City of Syracuse, which they split. District 53 is generally the eastern and northern suburbs of Syracuse, plus half of the City, whereas district 54 are the southern and western suburbs, as well as the nearby minor cities of Seneca Falls, Auburn, and Cortland.   Western New York & Southern Tier: Districts 55, 56, 57, 58, 59, 60, 61, 62, 63. Half of these districts are largely rural with no major population centers within them. The other half split up the two largest cities in New York outside of New York City. District 60 and 61 are Buffalo and its inner suburbs. District 60 includes almost all of the majority black neighborhoods of Buffalo, keeping them united in a single district. Districts 57 and 58 are Rochester and its largest suburbs (with most of the majority black areas of Rochester kept in a single district), as well as the City of Geneseo approximately 30 miles south of the center of the City. District 55 is a sprawling district that stretches from the Finger Lakes, along the south shore of Lake Ontario, to Lake Oneida. It consists of all of Wayne and Ontario Counties, which make up most of its population, as well as parts of Oswego, Cayuga, and Seneca counties. District 56 consists of most of the Southern Tier and some of the least densely populated areas of New York State. District 59 is Niagara County and some outer suburbs of Buffalo in Erie County, while District 62 is the rural area between Buffalo and Rochester. District 63 is a large, mostly rural district in the southwest corner of the state.
  • Jack
    September 20, 2021
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    Dear Commissioners, Below is a link to a map and data on Dave's Redistricting app. I read an article that the commission was deadlocked, for lack of a better term, and created two separate draft maps. The map below is a little different from both of the maps published by the commission. Perhaps it will give you some ideas that can help you work toward a compromise, or not. In any case, it wasn't that difficult to create, I've already done it, I might as well share it. While it is different, there are some similarities to the Rep. map, at least, outside NYC. There is a Pa border district, a Vermont border district, and a Mass/Conn border district. Of course, the Rochester district is similar to both maps. As far as NYC goes, this map may, or may not have similarities to both maps. It's hard for me to tell. It is certainly different, in some ways, from the current map. That said, there doesn't appear to be too much disruption to the current incumbents. Of course, there is some, and given the fact the NY is losing a district that's to be expected, I suppose. As near as I can tell, Rice and Suozzi might be in the same district the way I have it drawn, as is Maloney and Delgado. Higgins and Jacobs are also in the same district the way I have it drawn, but that is easily corrected by making a Buffalo centric district as both of your maps have. If you were to do that, my recommendation would be that Western NY look more like the Dem map. In addition to tweaking the 23rd and 24th, as I have them drawn, a little tweaking to the 19th, 20th, and 21st, might make it a little more palatable to the powers that be. As for me, I have no political affiliation, I'm not even a resident of New York. I just have an interest in redistricting, in general, and I was a professional numbers cruncher, and the app was available to play around with. So, I have no bias one way or the other. The only criteria I used for this was geography and population. That's it. Is it perfect? Of course not, no plan is. But, maybe, it will give you a couple ideas to move forward. Good Luck! https://davesredistricting.org/join/ebf6a85b-f147-4c1c-830a-894066c5918f
  • Mark
    September 17, 2021
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    Map for the 11 Upstate Congressional Districts that intentionally disfavors several incumbent Republicans, just to show that this can be done without dividing counties. (I still prefer my previously-proposed map.)
  • Mark
    September 17, 2021
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    Upstate districting for NY Senate, Westchester northward (reserving New Rochelle, Mamaroneck, Pelham and Scarsdale to be combined with a portion of the Bronx to make a complete district). The only differences between this and a prior map that I submitted is a rearrangement of Onondaga County towns. This moves Geddes out of the "core" of Onondaga County, exchanging them for 4 other towns with a similar combined population. This returns incumbent Sen. Jack Mannion (Geddes) into a separate district from Sen. Rachel May (Syracuse), while doing no significant harm to other goals. The only reason I had not done this earlier, is that I mistakenly thought Sens. Mannion and May both resided within the City of Syracuse, which I did not want to divide between districts. Once I realized that they are in separate jurisdictions within Onondaga County, it became a trivial matter to keep them in separate districts.
  • Jack
    September 16, 2021
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    This is a fair New York congressional map I created using Dave's Redistricting. This map includes eleven majority-minority districts. This map holds nine competitive districts based on an average of recent statewide New York elections.
  • Kiah
    September 16, 2021
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    My name is Kiah Thomas and I've grown up in Port Chester all my life. And while growing up I've realized that my community is being held hostage by Republicans who don't care about the black and brown people in this community. We need people like Mondaire Jones fighting for us in Port Chester and Rye Brook and all the other communities he serves now. We cannot afford to lose his representation, our lives depend on it!
  • Cynthia
    September 15, 2021
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    Senate District 34 Remapping, shifts some borders up, and also clarifies some neighborhood splitting in Mosholu and Soundview.
  • Lurie
    September 15, 2021
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    Attached please find advisory draft maps for communities of interest for New Yorkers of African descent in New York City, submitted by the Center for Law and Social Justice at Medgar Evers College (CLSJ). These maps are not final; they are a work in progress and are submitted to provide guidance as CLSJ continues its work as part of the Unity Maps Coalition. Throughout the redistricting and mapping process, CLSJ will provide additional documents and submissions in order to assist in the development and analysis of district configurations and their resulting impact on communities of interest for New Yorkers of African descent.
  • Ethel
    September 15, 2021
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    Crown Heights North & Bed Stuy Brooklyn /Kings County
  • Irsa
    September 15, 2021
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    This is the Crown Heights North Map that accompanies the written testimony from Irsa Weatherspoon for today’s (9/15/21) hearing.